ANTHONY CUDAHY & JENNA BEASLEY

PALE HORSE 

JANUARY 19-FEBRUARY 23, 2019 

The work in Pale Horse takes its inspiration from the Apocalypse Tapestries, completed in Angers, France during the 14th century. Moments from that work transform and find their way into the paintings of Jenna Beasley and Anthony Cudahy. 

Jenna Beasley, Flametreader, 2018, acrylic dye on muslin, 40’’x44’’

Jenna Beasley, Flametreader, 2018, acrylic dye on muslin, 40’’x44’’

Jenna Beasley, Twinned organism, 2018, paraffin wax, 9’’x12’’

Jenna Beasley, Twinned organism, 2018, paraffin wax, 9’’x12’’

Jenna Beasley, Heatwave, 2018, paraffin wax, 9 x 12 inches

Jenna Beasley, Heatwave, 2018, paraffin wax, 9 x 12 inches

Jenna Beasley, Four Horsewomen of the Apocalypse, 2018, Paraffin wax, silk, dye, 20 x 20 x 12

Jenna Beasley, Four Horsewomen of the Apocalypse, 2018, Paraffin wax, silk, dye, 20 x 20 x 12

Jenna Beasley, Four Horsewomen of the Apocalypse, 2018, Paraffin wax, silk, dye, 20 x 20 x 12

Jenna Beasley, Four Horsewomen of the Apocalypse, 2018, Paraffin wax, silk, dye, 20 x 20 x 12

Jenna Beasley, Four Horsewomen of the Apocalypse, 2018, Paraffin wax, silk, dye, 20 x 20 x 12

Jenna Beasley, Four Horsewomen of the Apocalypse, 2018, Paraffin wax, silk, dye, 20 x 20 x 12

Jenna Beasley (b. 1987) lives and works in New York. She received a BFA in Painting from Indiana University in 2011 and is currently an MFA candidate in Studio Art at Hunter College.  In 2016 she was the recipient of a Fulbright Grant to teach and live in Madrid, Spain. Jenna has been included in recent exhibitions at the Fuller Projects in Bloomington, IN, Espacio Mediodia in Madrid, Skylab Gallery in Columbus, Ohio, and Hunter College’s 205 Project Space in New York.

“My recent work examines a natural environment in flux and its influence on psychic space.  I frequently use landscapes or natural motifs to represent the dissonant emotional experience of living in a world in the midst of climate change.  For Pale Horse, both Anthony and I worked from a medieval tapestry called the Tapestry of the Apocalypse which resides in Angers, France.  I was drawn to how much of the iconography used to represent apocalypse in this tapestry from the 1300s resonates with the sorts of natural disasters we know are associated with human-caused climate change.  Moments of iconography from the tapestry are featured or quoted in the work, though with a changed setting or context.  Much of the time the phenomenon of climate change, which some might liken to a slow apocalyptic event, goes on unnoticed or unseen, simply operating as an ominous background idea to our everyday lives. I started working with materials associated with the everyday or the domestic, such as candle wax and silk, in reference to this idea; the magnitude of a threat too great to comprehend can sometimes manifest as banal, diminutive, or extremely subtle.” -Jenna Beasley, 2018

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